Kingsport: Gaines-Anderson Cabin Reconstruction

Back in April, 2014, I photographed the dismantling of the Ambrose Gaines/John Anderson cabin on Highway 11 W in Kingsport, Tennessee. The next month, I began photographing the reconstruction of the cabin at the Exchange Place in Kingsport. The Exchange Place occupies a portion of farm land once owned by John S. Gaines. Both Gaines properties were purchased from the 1756 Pendleton Land Grant, a geographic region that defines this area historically. John Gaines later sold the current Orebank Road site to John Preston. Following is a photo essay I’ve created to document the reconstruction and restoration of the log house on the Gaines-Preston Farm.

May 19, 2014The Exchange Place Association hosts a Groundbreaking Ceremony. This video gives a history of the home and farm occupants and owners and introduces the Burows, for whom the cabin will be named.

May 28, 2014 – Site for reconstruction is located in front of the barn. The ground is leveled and foundation is begun.

1May2802 The logs are laid out on the main lawn and are cleaned and inspected.

2May2804Labeling at time of dismantling assists carpenters in reconstruction. N for north, W for west, etc.

3May2806June 2 – The foundation progresses and stones are procured for it.

4Jun0225

June 9 – The temporary workshop gives the carpenters a place to prepare the logs out of the hot, summer sun.

9Jun09128The quickest way to get a log onto the wall.

10Jun09131June 13 – The structure begins to take shape. Enough stone builds up the corners that logs can be added.

5Jun1335June 17 – Floor joists have been installed on both sides and the left side begins to rise.

The Gaines-Anderson cabin had a double center wall without interior access between the two halves. in this photo, it becomes apparent that The Burows Museum is being constructed with a dog trot design and both sides will be accessible from the center.

The Gaines-Anderson cabin had a double center wall without interior access between the two halves. In this photo, it becomes apparent that The Burows Museum is being constructed with a dog trot design and both sides will be accessible from the center.

The carpenters are drilling the logs to accommodate electrical requirements.

Jun1743

7Jun1744June 20 – Attention is now directed toward the right half of the structure.

8Jun2087June 24 – Some days I use a zoom lens and photograph the cabin without getting out of my car. . .

11Jun2402Same day – . . . and this is why.

12Jun2403June 30 – Bringing more logs which have been stored on the lower acreage.

13Jun30155314Jun301546July 5 – The logs for the upper floor are assembled next to the site.

15July0502July 10 – Contractor Mike Faust. He has nicknamed me, “Paparazzi.” Here he is installing the joists for the dog trot.

16Jul1001July 16 – Floor boards for the first floor are completed on a beautiful East Tennessee summer’s day.

17Jul1699August 4 – Construction slowed at several points when new lumber had to be procured from freshly harvested trees. The carpenters prepare the new logs with hand tools.

Mr. Faust's carepenters are the nicest people and were willing to answer all of my questions.

Mr. Faust’s carpenters are the nicest people and were willing to answer all of my questions.

August 4 – The joists for the second floor are installed.

20Aug492August 22 – Framing for the roof is constructed on the lawn.

21Aug2229September 12 – Framing for the left half is finished. The dog trot door is visible from this angle and more of the stone work has been completed.

22Sep1201September 24 – The Exchange Place Association secures the services of a videographer and publishes an amazing update on the construction. Watch it here.

October 14 – The second floor on the right half begins to rise.

23Oct1403October 30 – Exciting day. The metal roof is installed.

24Oct3081November 13 – The roof is complete and carpenters have begun placing the chinking between the logs of the dog trot.

25Nov1305December 31 – The stone work is complete.

While the Association did elect to reconstruct a stone foundation which was original to the home, the original stone fireplace is not being restored.

While the Association did elect to reconstruct a stone foundation, which was original to the home, the original stone fireplace will not be included in the project.

The gables, chinking, windows, and interior are still on the project list, but you can see that the cabin is beautifully made and situated and is a wonderful tribute to longtime Exchange Place volunteers Dick and Suzanne Burow.

The Exchange Place is open Saturdays and Sundays from 2-4:30 pm, May-October, and for special events and tours by appointment.
Exchange Place
4812 Orebank Road
Kingsport,TN 37664
423-288-6071

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8 Responses to Kingsport: Gaines-Anderson Cabin Reconstruction

  1. Martha Dingus says:

    As a member of the staff of Bancroft Gospel Ministry which donated the logs to Exchange place I thank you for this documentation. It is wonderful to see the museum coming together. My husband, Jeff, and I lived in this house when it was on Stone Drive for almost 20 years and raised our children there. We are happy to see it coming together again.

  2. Thank you for a beautiful and informative presentation.
    We really appreciate your time and effort put into this project.
    Thank you also for including videos by Tim and myself.

    This will be a treasure for the Exchange Place and the Burow family.
    John W. Mullen

  3. Billee Moore says:

    This is a wonderful documentation of a long awaited addition to Exchange Place. Thank you!

  4. Marshall Adesman says:

    Like Charlotte, I am also a member of the Steering Committee, and I just wanted to thank you for the beautiful and thorough photo essay on what will become the Burow Museum. With your permission, I would like to share this with our many volunteers.

  5. As I sit in my office in Miami, I clicked on your post. Having been somewhat involved with the Gaines-Anderson cabin and its subsequent dedication to become a museum, I am so pleased to get your post. (I am on the steering committee for Exchange Place and a volunteer).
    You have captured the story from the beginning with the Gaines- Anderson House. Bancroft Ministries, represented by a descendant of the Gaines family, had approached members of the steering committee about the donation of the cabin to be relocated to Exchange Place. With the connection to the Gaines family, it seemed a natural fit.
    There had long been an interest in having a museum to portray history of Exchange Place, and this provided a way to do that.
    Your photo-essay with the links especially to the ground-breaking provides a great retrospective of the Gaines-Anderson cabin and its relocation to become the Dick and Suzanne Burrow Museum.
    Thank you for your work in preserving our history.

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