Archives: Etched in Stone

I was not sure how to categorize today’s post. Genealogy? Field Trip? I just wanted to share this marvelous family cemetery I came across on a recent outing and point out some of the clever things this family is doing to preserve their history.This blog post is dedicated to archivist Brianne Wright, who is fond of proclaiming “Your blog is amazing,” and “award-winning,” even though she is the one who nominated it for the award! Thanks for the support, Brianne!

I blogged about the Fain Plantation in this post. I did not have room to write about the family cemetery, however. It sits on a hill top with a 360 degree view of the surrounding mountains and farmland across Bloomingdale Road from the main house.

The Fain Family Cemetery

View of the Fain Family Cemetery from the main house.

What is so unusual about this very old cemetery is how well it is still kept up. Usually, when a large estate is broken up, some new owner gets the portion with the cemetery, family members move away and time and pasture animals begin to have their way with the grave markers. But, the Fain cemetery is fenced and well-groomed. Here is that gorgeous view I was telling you about.

Looking west toward Bays Mountain.

Looking west toward Bays Mountain.

Looking south towards Chestnut Ridge.

Looking south towards Chestnut Ridge.

Looking east up Bloomingdale toward the old Newland property.

Looking east up Bloomingdale toward the old Newland property.

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Looking north toward the plantation home.

Here is the back side of the marker that gives the name of the cemetery. Click to enlarge to read a bit of family history.

In memory of Thomas and Rachel Fain who came to this section in 1840 naming i Arcadia. Set aside this spot for the family cemetery. Erected by Mack and Mary Fain Hicks.

In memory of Thomas and Rachel Fain who came to this section in 1840 naming it Arcadia. Set aside this spot for the family cemetery. Erected by Mack and Mary Fain Hicks.

Such a great idea to not only name and mark the cemetery but to include some history, as well.

Most of the gravestones also include quite a bit of identifying genealogical information. Below is a fine example.

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Often, when I am exploring a cemetery, I notice markers where the wife’s own maiden name is not included, let alone parents’ names. The above marker also includes day and date and not just the year, which is so helpful.

Lastly, I want to show you what the family has done with weathered stones.

The stones is kept but it has been re-etched, retaining its legibility.

The weathered stone is kept but it has been re-etched, retaining its legibility.

It was amazingly touching to see the care given this cemetery and the information recorded for visiting family members. I hope it gives you some good ideas. To see more images from the Fain Cemetery, visit the findAgrave site.

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One Response to Archives: Etched in Stone

  1. Shauna Blotter says:

    I loved this! Thanks Miss Kari Lynne 🙂

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